Politics and Pop culture

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So a Black boy needs to be an angel in order to not be deserving of death? Is this the conclusion of the New York Times article?

This relates to the ludicrous nature of respectability politics.

In a way, respectability politics doesn’t really exist. I say that in the sense that it isn’t possible for a Black person to ever be worthy and valuable within a white supremacist context. This is abundantly true if an apparently reputable publication is using facts that are true of many American teenagers to paint Mike Brown as somebody deserving of being executed.

But even the New York Times article stepped around its true conclusion. It isn’t that Mike Brown deserved to die because he wasn’t perfect. He didn’t deserve to die because he got into “at least one scuffle” or because he had tried marijuana or because he wasn’t constantly on the honor roll. He deserved to die because he’s Black. According to white supremacist discourse every Black person deserves to die.

Fundamentally, the idea that being respectable will save you is dangled over Black people’s head. But it’s a false promise. Respectability politics is an ideology that Black people use to police ourselves — to limit ourselves. And to what gain?

There is no such thing as being a respectable Black person outside of the Black community. Everything that makes us respectable in our own eyes is dismissed in the larger world.

To be Black is to be un-respectable.

At the end of the day if our humanity can be parsed by not getting good grades or experimenting with drugs then we were never accorded humanity to begin with.

excerpt from “He Was No Angel”: There is No Such Thing as Black Innocence" @ One Black Girl. Many Words.  (via daniellemertina)

(via itinerantpoet)

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gorlt:

and, if you can’t get toasted pearl Couscous handpicked and blessed by a Moroccan shaman on the first tuesday of the winter harvest for your Sautéed Escarole then store bought is fine

image

(via itinerantpoet)

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Once Upon A Time Finale

OutlawQueen fans, I wouldn’t be too concerned about the return of the fair Maiden. Partners who return from the dead at the Worst. Possible. Moment. fall into the category Soap Opera Cliches 101. It’s right up there with meeting cute or hating each other at first sight. She’s just a temporary roadblock. She’ll either have to go back or she’ll die as part of rescuing them all from the new Big Bad

Filed under OUAT OutlawQueen finale

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To love a TV show is to know one of two things: Either it will eventually leave you, or you will eventually leave it. There’s no middle ground for the committed. Once you’re in, you’re in, and you’re going to be in until the thing is canceled or until you lose interest because you’ve either figured out all of the show’s tricks or it’s just not the same anymore. That show you loved more than anything? It will eventually feel sort of old and pointless to you after a while, and you’ll have moved on to some new thing that feels fresher but will inevitably disappoint you somewhere down the line. And so it goes. You’ll someday remember that show you loved with such intensity—it will probably be off the air by this point—and you’ll wonder idly why they don’t make ’em like that anymore. The answer is because you’re not who you were anymore, and you can’t fall for a show like that because you’re no longer the same person.

Todd VanDerWerff (The A.V. Club)

(via heartsways)